The Steering Committee of the “Celebrating Nonviolent Resistance” International Nonviolence Conference calls for proposals for workshops, small panels, roundtables and individual presentations. The conference will be held December 27-30, 2005 in Bethlehem, Palestine .

Conference organizers welcome submissions that relate to the four main tracks of the conference, namely:

Theory and Methods of Nonviolence

Panels, presentations and workshops in this track will examine the theory of nonviolence and the principles guiding it. What are the challenges of putting theory into practice? What are the theoretical underpinnings of reconciling theory and the practice of nonviolence considering diverse backgrounds and frameworks (i.e. War on Terror)? How should activists decide which methods and strategies to use?

Celebrating Nonviolent Movements: Past, Present and Future

This track is activist-oriented and international in scope. Panels, workshops and presentations should share experiences and draw lessons learned from nonviolent struggles in varying contexts across time and space. Presenters will explore the challenges currently being faced by nonviolence activists in the pursuit of truth, justice and social change. Are we achieving our aims? Is nonviolence still relevant in the midst of global realigning and political developments? There will be time and space in this track for meetings of activists engaged in particular struggles to talk and strategize.

Palestinian Nonviolent Movements and their Allies

One of the oldest and most protracted on-going struggles is that of the Palestinians. This track specifically looks into the Palestinian nonviolent struggle, its context, the dynamics of the different sectors of the movement and its current challenges. This strand will also examine the roles played by allied movements and organizations within Israeli and International civil society.

Religion and Nonviolence

“Thou Shalt Not Kill” is a unifying thread among many religions, one that is often seen as the basis for nonviolence. Therefore, how can we revitalize our religions to be agents of nonviolent resistance rather than violent strife? Could nonviolence be the catalyst and foundation for dialogue among religions? Could struggles for social change and self-determination, even those where faith and religion are fundamental elements of the conflict, be waged through nonviolent means? Are there existing frameworks for approaching an inter-religious dialogue based on common ideals and principles among/within religions?

Proposals must arrive to the Program Committee by Monday, October 15, 2005, and must conform to the guidelines listed below. Late proposals may not be included. Additional opportunities to form interest groups and thematic conversations at the conference will be available, particularly within the Past, Present and Future of Nonviolence track. Proposals should be sent to celeregister@celebratingnv.org or 4545 42nd Street NW, Suite 209, Washington, DC, USA 20016.

Panels: Will be organized around a common theme or problem with approximately 4 presenters, and a moderator. Each panel should provide a clear abstract that explains the overall purpose of the panel, a very brief biography of each participant and a 250 word abstract that captures each presenter’s topic. Each presenter must contribute to the proposed theme of the panel in a clear and direct way, and it should be obvious which of the four tracks the panel is aimed at.

Roundtables: Designed to promote discussion and debate for the designated themes, issues and challenges facing nonviolence movements around the world. Each roundtable should consist of a point person and two to three other participants who will stimulate and engage their audience in a lively discussion. They should include, when appropriate, multiple points of view. Each of these ‘Roundtable Participants’ will not provide presentations, but will have the specific role of encouraging and focusing the following discussion by the wider audience. Submissions should include an abstract explaining the rationale for the particular theme, issue or problem proposed and a summary of the major debates surrounding the issue. 

Workshops and Individual Presentations: Individuals or groups wishing to conduct a workshop or present a paper on a topic related to one of the four tracks above should draft an abstract of 300 words along with an outline of the workshop as well as a brief explanation of how the proposed workshop relates to one of the tracks. Submissions should also include a brief statement about the experience of the workshop leaders or presenters.

Audio-Visual Needs: Must be noted on your submission forms and we will do our best to meet your needs. We cannot provide LCD projectors and we cannot guarantee that we will be able to access enough AV equipment to meet everyone’s needs. Equipment will be apportioned on a first-come first-serve basis in terms of submitted and accepted proposals.

** Conference Participants are required to obtain the necessary visa. Please visit the Travel/Housing section of the website for more information on visas.